Q and A, for Power of Attorney in Scotland: Protecting Your Familys Future

What is a power of attorney?

A power of attorney is a legal document that allows an individual, known as the "granter," to appoint another person, referred to as the "attorney," to make decisions and act on their behalf. This legal tool is particularly useful in situations where the principal is unable to make decisions due to physical or mental incapacity.

The power of attorney grants the attorney-in-fact the authority to handle various matters on behalf of the principal, decisions to medical and healthcare choices. The scope of the [power of attorney powers can be defined in the document itself, specifying the areas in which they are authorised to act.

There are different types of powers of attorney available, depending on the specific needs and circumstances of the principal. A general power of attorney grants broad authority to the POA allowing them to handle a wide range of legal, financial, and personal matters. On the other hand, a limited power of attorney restricts the POA's powers to specific tasks or a defined period of time.

Creating a power of attorney requires careful consideration and attention to detail. It is crucial to work with a qualified and experienced legal professional who can guide you through the process and ensure that your interests are protected. Consulting with a family law expert is particularly important when dealing with family matters, as they can provide specialized advice tailored to your unique situation. In conclusion, a power of attorney is a vital legal tool that allows individuals to delegate decision-making authority.

What rights does a power of attorney holder possess?

As a legal expert, I understand that families in Hamilton may have questions regarding the rights and responsibilities of a power of attorney holder. In this blog post, I aim to provide a comprehensive answer to the question: "What rights does a power of attorney holder possess?" Firstly, it is important to clarify what a power of attorney (POA) is. A power of attorney is a legal document that grants someone, known as the attorney-in-fact or the agent, the authority to act on behalf of another person, known as the principal. The principal is typically an individual who may be unable to make or communicate decisions due to physical or mental incapacity or may simply wish to delegate decision-making authority. Now, let's delve into the specific rights that a power of attorney holder possesses:

1. Financial Decisions: One of the primary rights granted to a power of attorney holder is the ability to make financial decisions on behalf of the principal. This can include managing bank accounts, paying bills, filing tax returns, and making investment decisions. However, the scope of these financial powers can vary depending on the specific terms outlined in the power of attorney document. It is crucial to carefully read and understand the document to determine the extent of these rights.

2. Legal Decisions: A power of attorney holder may have the authority to make legal decisions for the principal. This can involve initiating or defending legal actions, signing legal documents, and representing the principal in legal matters. Again, the specific powers grantedto the power of attorney holder in terms of legal decisions can vary depending on the language used in the power of attorney document.

3. Healthcare Decisions: Another important right that a power of attorney holder may possess is the ability to make healthcare decisions for the principal. This can include making decisions about medical treatments, consenting to or refusing medical procedures, and accessing the principal's medical records. It is important to note that in some cases, there may be specific restrictions or limitations on the power of attorney holder's healthcare decision-making authority, particularly when it comes to end-of-life decisions.

4. Property Management: In certain situations, a power of attorney holder may be granted the authority to manage the principal's property. This can involve buying or selling real estate, managing rental properties, or making decisions related to the principal's personal belongings. Similar to financial and legal decisions, the specific rights and responsibilities related to property management can be outlined in the power of attorney document.

It is important to keep in mind that the rights and responsibilities of a power of attorney holder are determined by the terms outlined in the power of attorney document. It is crucial to consult with a legal professional to ensure that the power of attorney document accurately reflects your wishes and provides the necessary authority to the appointed POA.

In summary, a power of attorney holder possesses rights in various areas including financial decisions, legal decisions, healthcare decisions, and property management. These rights can vary depending on the specific terms and language used in the power of attorney document. It is important to work with a legal professional to draft a power of attorney document that suits your specific needs and provides clear guidelines for the power of attorney holder.

How can I make a power of attorney?

Are you considering creating a power of attorney? A power of attorney is a legal document that grants someone else the authority to make decisions on your behalf. Whether you are planning for the future or facing an unexpected situation, having a power of attorney can provide peace of mind and ensure that your interests are protected.

To help you navigate this important legal process, we have put together a step-by-step guide on how to make a power of attorney in Hamilton:

1. Understand the Different Types of Power of Attorney:

Before creating a power of attorney, it’s important to familiarize yourself with the different types available. In Hamilton, there are two main types: general power of attorney and enduring power of attorney. A general power of attorney gives someone the authority to make decisions on your behalf for a specific period of time or for a specific purpose. On the other hand, an enduring power of attorney grants someone the authority to make decisions on your behalf even if you become mentally incapacitated.

2. Seek Professional Legal Advice:

Creating a power of attorney is a significant legal decision, and it’s highly recommended to seek professional legal advice. An experienced family lawyer can guide you through the process, ensure that your document meets all legal requirements, and tailor it to your specific needs and circumstances.

3. Choose the Right Attorney:

Selecting the right attorney is crucial. This person will be making decisions on your behalf, so it’s essential to choosesomeone who is trustworthy, reliable, and has your best interests at heart. Consider their experience, knowledge, and communication skills when making your decision. It may also be helpful to have a conversation with the potential attorney to ensure they understand your wishes and are willing to fulfill their responsibilities.

4. Clearly Define the Powers and Responsibilities:

When creating a power of attorney, it’s important to clearly define the powers and responsibilities you are granting to the attorney. This can include financial decisions, legal decisions, healthcare decisions, and property management. Be specific and detailed in outlining these powers to avoid any confusion or misunderstandings in the future.

5. Draft the Power of Attorney Document:

Once you have decided on the type of power of attorney and chosen the right attorney, it’s time to draft the document. This is where seeking professional legal advice becomes crucial. A family lawyer can ensure that the document follows all legal requirements and includes all necessary provisions to protect your interests.

6. Review and Sign the Document:

After the power of attorney document has been drafted, it’s important to review it carefully. Make sure all the powers and responsibilities are accurately reflected and that you fully understand the document before signing it. It may also be helpful to have a legal professional review the document with you to ensure its validity and compliance with all legal requirements.

7. Communicate Your Decision:

Once the power of attorney document has been signed, it’s important to communicate your decision to all relevant parties. This can include family members, healthcare providers or friends.

How long does a power of attorney last?

A power of attorney is a legal document that allows someone, known as the “attorney-in-fact” or “agent,” to make decisions and act on behalf of another person, known as the “principal.” The duration of a power of attorney can vary depending on the specific circumstances and the type of power of attorney that is being used.

In general, a power of attorney can be either a durable power of attorney or a non-durable power of attorney.

A durable power of attorney remains in effect even if the principal becomes incapacitated or mentally incompetent. This means that the attorney-in-fact can continue to make decisions on behalf of the principal, even if they are unable to do so themselves. A durable power of attorney will usually specify when it becomes effective and when it will terminate. It can either have a specific end date or it can continue until the principal revokes it.

On the other hand, a non-durable power of attorney is only effective while the principal is mentally competent. If the principal becomes incapacitated or mentally incompetent, the non-durable power of attorney will no longer be valid. This type of power of attorney is often used for specific, short-term transactions or situations.

In addition to the distinction between durable and non-durable powers of attorney, there are also specific powers of attorney that are used for certain purposes. For example, a healthcare power of attorney allows the attorney-in-fact to make medical decisions on behalf of the principal, while a financial power ofattorney grants the attorney-in-fact the authority to handle financial matters.

The duration of these specific powers of attorney can also vary. Some may be limited to a certain time period, such as during a hospital stay, while others may be ongoing until the principal revokes it or passes away.

It’s important to carefully consider the duration of a power of attorney and choose the type that best suits your needs. If you anticipate needing someone to make decisions on your behalf for an extended period of time, a durable power of attorney may be the right choice. However, if you only need someone to handle specific transactions or situations, a non-durable power of attorney may be more appropriate.

Regardless of the type and duration of the power of attorney, it’s crucial to regularly review and update the document to ensure it still aligns with your wishes and circumstances. Life events such as marriage, divorce, birth, or death can all impact the validity and effectiveness of a power of attorney.

Consulting with a legal professional can provide guidance and ensure that you have a power of attorney that is tailored to your specific needs and circumstances. They can also help you understand the legal implications of granting someone the authority to make decisions on your behalf.

What is lasting power of attorney?

The term “Lasting Power of Attorney” (LPA) is specifically used in England and Wales. It’s a legal mechanism allowing individuals or third parties to appoint one or more people to make decisions on their behalf if they lose the capacity to do so themselves. This concept is part of the legal framework established under the Mental Capacity Act 2005 in England and Wales and in Scotland Adults with Incapacity (Scotland) Act 2000.

Different jurisdictions have similar instruments but under different names:

Here in Scotland, as mentioned earlier, the equivalent is simply called a “Power of Attorney” (POA), encompassing both Continuing and Welfare Powers of Attorney.

In Northern Ireland, it’s known as “Enduring Power of Attorney” (EPA), although its scope and application might differ slightly from POAs in England and Wales.

In many other countries, similar concepts exist but are often known by different terms and may have variations in legal processes and requirements.

A Power of Attorney (POA) is a legal document that allows an individual (known as the “donor”) to appoint one or more persons (known as “attorneys”) to make decisions on their behalf. This arrangement becomes particularly important if the donor loses the capacity to make decisions for themselves due to reasons such as illness, injury, or the onset of a condition like dementia.

In scotland There are two types of POAs:

Health and Welfare POA: This allows the attorney to make decisions about the donor’s daily routine, medical care, moving into a care home, and life-sustaining treatment. It can only be used once the donor has lost the capacity to make these decisions for themselves.

Property and Financial Affairs POA: This type of POA gives the attorney the authority to manage the donor’s bank accounts, pay bills, collect income and benefits, and even sell their house, among other financial matters. Unlike the Health and Welfare LPA, it can be used as soon as it’s registered, with the donor’s permission.

Key points about POAs include:

Capacity: The donor must have the mental capacity to make the POA and understand the implications of the arrangement.

Registration: POAs need to be registered with the relevant legal authority (like the Office of the Public Guardian in Scotland, England and Wales) before they can be used.

Choice of Attorney: The donor can nominate a trusted friend, family member, or a professional like a solicitor. They can appoint more than one attorney and specify how they should work together.

Safeguards: POAs include certain safeguards to protect the interests of the donor, such as the requirement for a certificate provider to confirm that the donor understands the LPA and isn’t under any pressure to sign it.


An POA is a powerful and important legal tool, ensuring that decisions about one’s personal welfare or financial matters are in trusted hands if they’re unable to make these decisions themselves.


In conclusion, the duration of a power of attorney can vary depending on the specific circumstances and type of power of attorney being used. It’s important to carefully consider your needs and consult with a legal professional to ensure you have a valid and effective power of attorney in place. Lanarkshire Law Practice are experst at providing this service to allow you to have your private affairs and finances in order should you require this at some stage on your life.

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